Solar power information and news

Policy

A note from Andrea Luecke, The Solar Foundation: 

Dear Solar Industry Professional,

The Solar Foundation is working with the U.S. Department of Energy and BW Research Partnership on the United States Energy and Employment Report and our annual Solar Jobs Census report.

This year, the U.S.  Department of Energy is surveying the energy, energy efficiency, and motor vehicle business community to provide policy makers, business leaders and energy stakeholders with key information about these critical sectors of our economy. 

As in years past with our Solar Jobs Census, this confidential, voluntary survey will take between fifteen to thirty minutes of your time and will provide us the valuable feedback we need to ensure the needs of companies like yours are well understood by the Energy Department, other federal agencies, and energy stakeholders.

Last year’s results: Solar Jobs Continue to Outpace US Economy

A note from Andrea Luecke, The Solar Foundation: 

Dear Solar Industry Professional,

The Solar Foundation is working with the U.S. Department of Energy and BW Research Partnership on the United States Energy and Employment Report and our annual Solar Jobs Census report.

This year, the U.S.  Department of Energy is surveying the energy, energy efficiency, and motor vehicle business community to provide policy makers, business leaders and energy stakeholders with key information about these critical sectors of our economy. 

As in years past with our Solar Jobs Census, this confidential, voluntary survey will take between fifteen to thirty minutes of your time and will provide us the valuable feedback we need to ensure the needs of companies like yours are well understood by the Energy Department, other federal agencies, and energy stakeholders.

Last year’s results: Solar Jobs Continue to Outpace US Economy

Jenn Runyon, Chief Editor of Renewable Energy World and Paula Mints, Chief Market Research Analyst with SPV Market Research discuss three hot topics in the global solar industry for three minutes each. Today’s topics are the government imposed tariffs, ohw low solar module prices are affecting manufacturers and Florida’s Amendment 1.

When I first got into solar, Florida seemed to be a natural market. After all, it’s the Sunshine State. In spite of the sun, there is one big problem that was holding back the market: the state of Florida prohibits residents from purchasing electricity from a source other than a utility. Unlike all other sunny states in the U.S., third party solar companies such as SolarCity, SunRun and Vivint are prohibited from providing solar leases and PPAs to homeowners. This utility-biased state policy has made it difficult for homeowners to finance their rooftop solar systems.

Fortunately, affordable solar loans are now available in Florida. These low interest and easy qualification loans help homeowners get to positive cash flow (electricity savings > financing costs). As a result, the rooftop solar industry in Florida is finally growing, in spite of the utilities’ anti-competitive policies.

My guest this week is Justin Hoysradt, CEO of Vinyasun, one of the leading residential solar installers in Florida. Please join me on this week’s Energy Show on Renewable Energy World as Justin talks about the opportunities for rooftop solar in Florida, as well as some of their unique requirements — such as mounting systems and panels that can resist hurricane-force winds.

Until recently, Spain had a very general self-consumption policy framework that applied to both grid-connected and off-grid systems. This month though, Spain’s Council of Ministers approved a new self-consumption law that has set the country’s solar advocates up in arms with the government. 

The main problem with the new law, say solar advocates, is that it taxes self-consumption PV installations even for the electricity they produce for their own use and don’t feed into the grid. Spain’s PV sector calls the new law a ‘sun tax.’ 

According to Spain’s Photovoltaic Union (UNEF), the new law requires self-consumption PV system owners to pay the same grid fees that all electricity consumers in Spain pay, plus a so-called ‘sun tax’. Specifically, said UNEF, a self-consumption PV owner "will pay a ‘sun tax’ for the whole power [capacity] installed (the power that you contracted to your electricity company, plus the power from your PV installation) and also another [second] ‘sun tax’ for the electricity that you generate and self-consume from your own PV installation (this applies to installations larger than 10 kW)." 

Until recently, Spain had a very general self-consumption policy framework that applied to both grid-connected and off-grid systems. This month though, Spain’s Council of Ministers approved a new self-consumption law that has set the country’s solar advocates up in arms with the government. 

The main problem with the new law, say solar advocates, is that it taxes self-consumption PV installations even for the electricity they produce for their own use and don’t feed into the grid. Spain’s PV sector calls the new law a ‘sun tax.’ 

According to Spain’s Photovoltaic Union (UNEF), the new law requires self-consumption PV system owners to pay the same grid fees that all electricity consumers in Spain pay, plus a so-called ‘sun tax’. Specifically, said UNEF, a self-consumption PV owner "will pay a ‘sun tax’ for the whole power [capacity] installed (the power that you contracted to your electricity company, plus the power from your PV installation) and also another [second] ‘sun tax’ for the electricity that you generate and self-consume from your own PV installation (this applies to installations larger than 10 kW)." 

Private equity infrastructure specialist Hudson Clean Energy Partners and Hong Kong-based independent power producer Sky Solar Holdings on September 21 announced they are outting as much as $100 million of equity capital to work in developing an international portfolio of solar PV projects.

Teaneck, New Jersey-based Hudson Clean Energy is investing $50 million to finance Sky Solar building, operating and maintaining eight solar PV projects with total generation capacity of some 128-MWdc in Chile and Uruguay. The New Jersey-based company will own a 49 percent share of the projects upon completion.

Private equity infrastructure specialist Hudson Clean Energy Partners and Hong Kong-based independent power producer Sky Solar Holdings on September 21 announced they are outting as much as $100 million of equity capital to work in developing an international portfolio of solar PV projects.

Teaneck, New Jersey-based Hudson Clean Energy is investing $50 million to finance Sky Solar building, operating and maintaining eight solar PV projects with total generation capacity of some 128-MWdc in Chile and Uruguay. The New Jersey-based company will own a 49 percent share of the projects upon completion.

Private equity infrastructure specialist Hudson Clean Energy Partners and Hong Kong-based independent power producer Sky Solar Holdings on September 21 announced they are outting as much as $100 million of equity capital to work in developing an international portfolio of solar PV projects.

Teaneck, New Jersey-based Hudson Clean Energy is investing $50 million to finance Sky Solar building, operating and maintaining eight solar PV projects with total generation capacity of some 128-MWdc in Chile and Uruguay. The New Jersey-based company will own a 49 percent share of the projects upon completion.

DOE released a final programmatic environmental impact statement for Hawaii to provide federal, state and county governments as well as the public and developers with a reference document for project-specific environmental reviews.

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